{\rtf1\ansi\ansicpg1252 {\fonttbl\f0\fnil\fcharset0 ArialMT;} {\colortbl;\red255\green255\blue255;\red51\green51\blue51;\red255\green255\blue255;} \deftab720 \pard\pardeftab720\partightenfactor0 \f0\fs26 \cf2 \cb3 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0 \outl0\strokewidth0 \strokec2 }
Connect
To Top

Catenative Verb Dictionary

Unique to the English language, catenative verbs form strings of verbs by linking the catenative verb to an infinitive, present participle, or base form of another verb. Derived from the verb catenate, which means “to connect, to link, to string together,” the adjective catenative refers to the connecting of one verb to another within a single verb phrase and without a conjunction. The verb that follows the catenative verb functions either as a direct object (usually) or a verb phrase complement (sometimes). The following dictionary lists the most common catenative verbs in the English language as well as the form that follows the verb.

A

admit – present participle
advise – present participle
afford – infinitive
agree – infinitive
aim – infinitive
allow – present participle
allowed (passive) – infinitive
appear – infinitive
appreciate – present participle
arrange – infinitive
ask – infinitive
asked (passive) – infinitive
attempt – infinitive
avoid – present participle

B

bear – infinitive, present participle
beg – infinitive
begin – infinitive, present participle
bother – infinitive

C

care – infinitive
choose – infinitive
complete – present participle
come – base
condescend – infinitive
consent – infinitive
consider – present participle
continue – infinitive, present participle

D

dare – infinitive
decide – infinitive
delay – present participle
deny – present participle
deserve – infinitive
detest – present participle
dislike – present participle

E

enjoy – present participle
escape – present participle
expect – infinitive

F

fail – infinitive
finish – present participle
forbid – present participle
forget – infinitive

G

go – base

H

happen – infinitive
have – infinitive
help – infinitive, present participle
hesitate – infinitive
hope – infinitive

I

imagine – present participle
imply – present participle
intend – infinitive, present participle

J

K

keep – present participle

L

like – infinitive, present participle
long – infinitive
love – infinitive, present participle

M

mean – infinitive, present participle
mind – present participle
miss – present participle

N

neglect – infinitive, present participle

O

offer – infinitive

P

permit – present participle
plan – infinitive
practice – present participle
prefer – infinitive, present participle
prepare – infinitive
pretend – infinitive
proceed – infinitive
promise – infinitive
propose – infinitive, present participle

Q

quit – present participle

R

recall – present participle
recommend – present participle
refuse – infinitive
regret – present participle
remember – infinitive, present participle
resent – present participle
resist – present participle
resume – present participle
risk – present participle

S

seem – infinitive
stand – present participle
start – infinitive, present participle
stop – infinitive, present participle
strive – infinitive
suggest – present participle
swear – infinitive

T

tend – infinitive
threaten – infinitive
tolerate – present participle
try – infinitive, present participle

U

undertake – infinitive

V

W

wait – infinitive
want – infinitive, present participle
wish – infinitive

X

Y

Z

More in English Verbs

  • English Auxiliary Verbs

    Auxiliary verbs are a subcategory of English verbs that provide additional semantic or syntactic information about the main verb in the...

    Heather JohnsonMarch 1, 2016
  • Ambitransitive English Verbs

    Verbs are traditionally defined as “words that describe actions or states of being.” Main or principal English verbs may be either...

    Heather JohnsonFebruary 25, 2016
  • Attributive Ditransitive English Verbs

    Traditional notional grammars define verbs as “action or state of being words.” Transitive verbs in English grammar are main verbs that...

    Heather JohnsonFebruary 23, 2016
  • Ditransitive English Verbs

    Verbs have traditionally been defined as “action or state of being words.” Main verbs, or principal verbs, fall into five categories...

    Heather JohnsonFebruary 18, 2016
  • Monotransitive English Verbs

    Notional grammars describe verbs as “action or state of being words.” Main verbs, or principal verbs, fall into five categories in...

    Heather JohnsonFebruary 16, 2016
  • Transitive English Verbs

    Verbs have traditionally been defined as “action or state of being words.” Main verbs, or principal verbs, fall into five categories...

    Heather JohnsonFebruary 11, 2016
  • Copular English Verbs

    Traditional grammars define verbs as “action or state of being words.” Main verbs, or principal verbs, fall into five categories in...

    Heather JohnsonFebruary 9, 2016
  • Intransitive English Verbs

    Notional grammars define verbs as “action or state of being words.” Main verbs, or principal verbs, fall into five categories in...

    Heather JohnsonFebruary 7, 2016
  • Grammatical Forms of English Verb Phrases

    A verb phrase is a phrase in which a verb functions as the head of the phrase plus any auxiliaries (modals,...

    Heather JohnsonApril 29, 2014

Pin It on Pinterest